Making doing good, doable

The WE Global Learning Centre is a welcoming space designed to foster exploration and learning among youth, designed to embody the organization’s mantra, “WE makes doing good, doable”.

Interior Designer: Karin Karak

Design Firm: k2 designworks inc.

Photographer: Philip Castleton Photography Inc.

The new design of the WE Global Learning Centre incorporates collaborative and inspirational working spaces, cutting-edge technology to sustain an internationally active charity, and provides a venue to shape next-generation leaders in an ecologically sustainable way.

Teams that had previously been isolated from one another were now offered combinations of enclosed offices, open work areas, various meeting and collaborative spaces which encourage greater synergy. Employee wellness is met through design features of ample natural light, calming and neutral palettes, catering to a young employee demographic that thrives on fluid engagement and changing tasks.

Due to the regular need for connectivity with external teams and stakeholders – cutting-edge technology was critical. Staff can now access video conferencing instantly, connecting them locally and abroad. Custom monitors stream original content, a donor wall is fitted with touch-screen navigation, an incubation hub supports entrepreneurs, Skype-supported classrooms offer global outreach, a 200-person amphitheatre can divide into two digital classrooms, and a multimedia control room and recording studio supporting instant content creation.

Throughout the restoration of the historic building’s envelope, the design team took care to return the brick finish and window sizes back to their original state. Inside, exposed brick was accentuated as a design feature, and recycled bricks were used wherever a wall was moved or expanded. The beams, posts, joists, and roof are all original materials and retrofitted in order to maintain the structure’s historic character and reuse the existing resources available.

The building’s automation system represents the latest technology that provides several environmentally respectful initiatives. Throughout all four levels, 39 micro-climates are heated and cooled independently and equipped with motion-sensor controlled lighting and systems that utilize daylight harvesting to reduce energy use.

Design inspiration was also drawn from some of the charity’s social objectives. Carpets sourced were sourced from an organization that partners with fishermen in the Philippines who use discarded nets that larger ships leave on the ocean floor and sell them to carpet manufactures who recycle the material into sustainable carpet flooring.

The building is designed with accessible water refill stations that reduce the need for bottled water. Water conservation facts are listed at each station as an enviro-design feature that tracks the number of plastic bottles saved. After six months of use, the refill stations have saved more than 32,000 plastic bottles.

The Art of Living Big in Small Spaces

City living has always been known as “tight” and “small” living, but not this time around. We call it “the art of living big’, no matter how small the space is. A space is a space, whether big or small, but the design is what introduces an element of fun and creativity.

At Sansa Interiors, we gave this project a soul by creating a way of being. We observed our clients and studied how they move, we found out their interests, their favourite colours, and their top travel destinations. We then took all of that and tailored it to a simple and clean dream apartment.

Our focus was to bring in subtle tones and finishes throughout the space with pops of colour. We experimented with manipulating positive and negative spaces to create a flow from one corner to the other.

The home office showcases the contrast between the clean white walls and the soft yet bold blush pink gallery wall and adjacent furniture. The furniture selection is very minimal and does not interfere with the ambient flow, instead, it helps create a successful grounding experience.

Some of the requirements we were given:

  1. Home office for two people
  2. A reading nook
  3. Clean/simple kitchen
  4. A place to retreat at the end of the day

Design Tips for Living Big:

  1. Mirrors near windows
  2. The more plants the better!
  3. A subtle colour palette with accent pieces to bring in pops of colour
  4. Minimal furniture
  5. Bring in your personality, via art pieces or woven pillows

Photography by Bruno Belli.

Bold colour blocking and biophilia energize this Ottawa co-working space

Project: GC Workplace Co-working Pilot Project
LWG Design Team: David Gibbons, ARIDO; Melanie Tracey, ARIDO; Kalmn Simmons, Intern, ARIDO

One of five Co-Working Pilot Projects built in the National Capital Area to provide a flexible, drop-in workspace for civil servants that are predominantly teleworking. This unassigned work environment provides an entire office ecosystem to support all the typical activities that occur in a normal workday, from heads-down space to areas for collaboration and everything in between. Our design includes bold colour blocking and biophilic elements.

A Winning Formula

When Syntegrity embarked on their search for property for their headquarters in Toronto, their goal was a space that would foster innovation, growth, and create opportunities for collaboration among employees, to reflect the core values of Syntegrity’s brand and culture.

Interior Designer: Roberta Diachok, ARIDO

Design Firm: Savills

Design Team: Rasha Al-Naqeeb, Intern ARIDO

Photographer: Bob Gundu

After thoughtful evaluation, Syntegrity was ready to commit to a long-term home. As an organization that solves complex challenges for global leaders across the world, it wanted to ensure their workplace aligned with their brand, culture, and their unique approach to problem-solving.

Syntegrity requested an interior designed to improve wellness and health for employees and clients. This challenged the Savills team to identify suitable spaces that could accommodate their unique specifications, before tackling the interior design portion. After a comprehensive analysis of the office market, including workplace and workforce strategies, a centrally located space with a long-term lease was found in Brookfield Place. Since 2012, Brookfield has proudly provided its tenants with LEED Design for existing building operations and maintenance, and Gold Certified office space. LEED certification recognizes sustainable building operations and performance, BOMA, and WELL certificates. It was the perfect fit.

Their lobby establishes the atmosphere from entry with via their unique logo becoming a feature element of the space. Throughout, sustainable materials were selected for their low impact, while the use of fewer materials and re-use of leftover acoustic panel pieces helped keep costs down. Syntegrity also sought a multi-purpose, plenary space, which Savills addressed by adding a warm atmosphere to the plenary space. It can transform to a town hall, boardroom, training centre, and an event venue. 

Overall, the space supports Syntegrity’s everyday business just as much as their special events and consulting sessions. A winning formula. 

This welcoming, airy space is conference central for a Toronto firm

It’s true … Better questions, yield better answers. When our professional services client asked us to develop a landmark facility that supports their lines of business, employee engagement and much needed event and client experience space, our minds, as designers, leapt to the countless ways their brand could be emphasized in the new space.  

Interior Designer: Lori Urwin, ARIDO

Design Team: Daniela Barbon, ARIDO; Meagan Buchanan, ARIDO; Susan Tienhaara, ARIDO;
Kaitlin McElroy, ARIDO

Design Firm: HOK

Project Photographer: Karl Hipolito

Our designers worked intimately with the client to create a classic, yet timeless space where events, dinners and educational forums can take place and showcase the firm’s innovation, knowledge and value to its clients. Expansive city views, tech-enabled boardrooms, collaborative meeting areas and a vibrant event space can all be found on the penthouse floor of a Toronto high rise with spectacular 360-degree views of the city and beyond.

Infused with daylight during the day and alluring mood lighting at night, the space accommodates all types of employee and client interactions. Plenty of gathering space for focused conversation was included to take advantage of the vistas, as well as provide additional breakout and quiet zones.

As the elevator doors open on the 40th floor, employees and guest are met with a highly polished and comfortable space, akin to a hotel venue. Prisms of light at entryways and across walls, clad in leather and metal screening, subtly reference the company’s logo. Twelve-foot, floor-to-ceiling windows complemented by clerestories and a glass ceiling invite daylight into the space and highlight the wood, leather, cool limestone and soft furnishings. Embracing a sense of light, air and space, the calm interiors are a backdrop for the stunning views of the city and lake beyond.

This newly constituted workplace for this firm has simplified operations, decreasing overall conference costs and enhancing the organization’s stature amongst employees, clients and the competition.