Flexibility is the key at this museum restaurant

Open for lunch service, the existing restaurant at the Gardiner Museum was relatively unknown, attracting mostly elderly patrons. Upon entry, spectacular city views were overshadowed by a cold, uninviting aesthetic, and the narrative of Canada’s National Museum of Ceramics was lost. Many people knew the space for its quality event service; with the ability to clear the space and create a spectacular setup for events with off-site rentals.

Interior Designer: Dyonne Fashina, ARIDO
Design Firm: Denizens of Design
Photographer: Larissa Issler

The new restaurant partner – The Food Dudes – provided a clear mandate – create a space that can easily convert between daytime restaurant service and evening events, and engage a new demographic while keeping the existing patronage happy.

Our goal was to provide the flexibility of multi-purpose with the aesthetic of a fixed-in-place restaurant.

The new design reconnects the space to the Museum’s focus while paying respect to the building’s architectural features. This meaningful concept influenced all aspects of the restaurant from the food and plating, to the branding and name. Clay itself is at the root of every detail, with inspiration taken from its properties and the process of clay making.

The minerals of clay tell the colour story, with rich terracotta hues, stoneware neutrals, and vibrant porcelain whites. Turned wood furniture and organic forms make subtle reference to the artifacts and tooling typically found inside a ceramist’s studio. 

Man serving wine behing a modern looking bar

Perhaps the most compelling addition is the custom bar. The front bar is clad entirely in durable commercial grade porcelain slabs, while the back bar integrates display opportunities to further extend the museum’s shop offerings – both a sales tool and an aesthetic choice. Smart planning decisions were implemented to create an optimal layout for the restaurant that could easily adapt to events. Modularity and compactness were key considerations due to the strict one-hour conversion timeframe. Existing storage was limited so locking storage solutions were integrated into the bar millwork.

Furniture and custom elements were strategically selected for optimization of storage space and efficiency of the teardown process. Folding dividers and mobile planters act to provide privacy and delineation within the space without the permanence of fixed partitions. Soft seating in vibrant hues define the bar/lounge area, while a more muted palette is used in the open dining area. 

All chairs stack on dollies, tables are flip-top with nesting legs, and the host and services stations are mobile on casters. These pieces adapt well for use during cocktail parties, lectures, and wedding receptions. It was important to have the functionality of multipurpose furniture, without the mundane aesthetic. The end result is a remarkably versatile space that does not compromise on design.

Village markets serve as inspiration for this modern juice shop

Village Juicery is a Toronto-based producer and distributor of raw, 100% organic cold-pressed juice and related plant-based food and beverage products. With five existing street-front locations throughout the city, Village Juicery has established a customer focused and community-driven reputation, with an emphasis on education supported by registered nutritionists.

Interior Designer: Ashley Rumsey, ARIDO; Stanley Sun, ARIDO

Design Firm: Mason Studio

Photographer: Scott Norsworthy

In their new location in Yorkdale Shopping Centre, the first to leave the streetscape, the space required the same atmosphere and brand experience as other locations, while meeting the demands of a high-volume store.

In their previous stores around Toronto, specific finishes and details have become markers of Village Juicery’s interior environments. Humble materials including naturally oiled wood, soapstone and repurposed industrial materials reference the raw and unprocessed nature of the products. The design team set out to maintain this established palette while incorporating new materials to meet higher standards for durability and maintenance.

Terracotta chimney flue liners clad the bar face and merchandise shelving, adding warmth and natural tones to the space, while the integrity of solid maple wood and natural soapstone are brought together with thoughtful joinery techniques to reflect the purity of the products.

A textured porcelain tile covers the wall surfaces, emulating corrugated metal and provides the refinement and durability that the site requires. Using village markets and exterior environments as inspiration, the floors are a natural slate stone in moss green to compliment the rich terracotta and maple wood tones. This interior/exterior environment is further emphasized by the awning that clads the exterior facade of the shop front.

Interior design is key to expressing the brand experience

The design for Picnic Food’s first street-front shop had to reference previous iterations, in subterranean concourses, in a refreshed experience.

Interior Designers: Ashley Rumsey, ARIDO; Stanley Sun, ARIDO

Design Firm: Mason Studio

Design Team: Marti Hawkins, Intern ARIDO

With more expansion in mind, an adaptable design needed features that would be both easily replicable as well as physically identifiable as key symbols of the brand experience. Repeated linear woven wood textures recall textiles commonly associated with picnics and become an iconic design element for future locations. The communal dining table returns on a trestle base while the lime and watermelon brand colours are present via with greenery in terracotta pots.