Media Kit

As the regulator of interior designers in Ontario, the ARIDO is happy to respond to media queries. The Association’s membership is ideally suited to comment on topics from design for healthcare, corporate projects, design for accessibility, home renovations, working with trades, building codes, and more. 

Requests can be emailed to Ali Moenck, Communications Coordinator at communications@arido.ca . If you would like to join the ARIDO’s mailing lists for press releases, media advisories, and briefings, please send your name, organization, contact details, and email address to communications@arido.ca

You may have questions about the field and what our members actually do.

What is interior design?
Why is interior design important?
What do Registered Interior Designers do?
Sector Experts
The title 'Interior Designer'
Designing for the Public
How do Registered Interior Designers become qualified?
What is ARIDO?
Association Spokespeople

What is interior design? 

Interior design is often confused with decoration and staging. While the aesthetics is a part of it, every interior designer begins their project considering the needs of the end user, whether it’s for school children, office workers, or a growing family. 

The Interior Design process and what Interior Designers do can be broken down into the following 4 steps: 

1- Research

Interior Designers begin their work by meeting with their client and establishing goals for the project, the client’s budget, and the client’s or end user’s needs. The Interior Designer may also visit the site and complete a survey of the existing space or intended site. 

2-Design

The Interior Designer will develop a detailed design concept with images, sketches and 3D views. They will also select materials, lighting, furniture and fixtures. The concept, preliminary drawings and images will be presented to the client. 

3-Document

At this point, the Interior Designer will prepare different documentation, depending on the type of project, for an office project they might create a floor plan that considers local fire codes, or for a home renovation they might apply for a building permit. 

4- Coordinate

During construction, an Interior Designer is there to oversee the project and make sure everything is completed accurately and on time. They are available to address any issues that arise during construction and have the skills to modify the design or plan accordingly. 

Why is interior design important?

Spend any time indoors and we all know, interior space plays hugely into our experience and attitude. Think of how the long hallways of a school permit the flow of people from class to class, or the expansive atrium of a museum can encourage you to think about the wonders of nature. Or how your own home can become a space of comfort and ease, welcoming you in after a long day. 

These spaces differ greatly, however, they all have clear purposes for how the space is used and how humans feel in that space. That is the impact of good interior design.

What do Registered Interior Designers do?

Interior Designers create functional and beautiful design solutions for a client’s home, business, or community in a collaborative process which considers a client’s vision, lifestyle, and budget. They will think about health and safety concerns, code compliance requirements, accessibility, lifestyle, and sustainability when designing a space. 

In Ontario, designs are required by provincial law to adhere to code and regulatory requirements and encourage the principles of environmental sustainability.

ARIDO members work in a variety of fields from residential to corporate commercial, healthcare, hospitality, public spaces and more, but that’s just the start, we have members who design interiors of funeral homes, places of worship, supermarkets, and all types of stores, restaurants and workplaces. 

Due to COVID-19, interior spaces are changing more than ever, Interior Designers are advising and working with clients on adapting their spaces for physical distancing, identifying antimicrobial products and materials, preparing for the reopening of their businesses and workplaces, as well as managing infection control procedures and the flow of movement.  

A few of our experts

Sector: Residential Design
Jennifer Suljak

Jill Smith, ARIDO

Name of Business

Joanne Chan

Jill Smith, ARIDO

Name of Business

Sector: Hospitality Design
Jennifer Suljak

Jill Smith, ARIDO

Name of Business

Joanne Chan

Jill Smith, ARIDO

Name of Business

The title 'Interior Designer'

In 1984, Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario Act was passed in the Legislature of Ontario. The act was amended by the passing of Bill Pr6 in 1999 which granted Registered Members of ARIDO the exclusive use of the title Interior Designer in the province of Ontario.

By giving legal standing to the designation of Interior Designer, the act acknowledges that ARIDO Registered Members meet and maintain a high level of qualifications and standards. The act safeguards the public by ensuring that the practitioners who hold the designation Interior Designer or ARIDO are fully qualified and possess the most current qualifications. It is against the law for any person in Ontario who is not a Registered member of ARIDO to use the title 'Interior Designer' or the designation 'ARIDO'.

When publishing content where the contributor is claiming to be an interior designer, you can reach out to ARIDO to double-check if they are legally allowed to use the title 'Interior Designer' or you can look them up in our Directory on BLOG//ARIDO.

Bill Pr6 (Chapter Pr6 Statutes of Ontario 1999)

An Act respecting the Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario, 1999

Designing for the Public

Registered Interior Designers  are qualified through a rigorous process of education, experience, and examination, and are skilled in assisting clients to realize their goals, creating environments which are both functional and beautiful.

ARIDO Registered members are required to:

As the title “Interior Designer” is protected via private legislation, ARIDO enforces protection of that title by regularly sending Cease & Desist letters to individuals who use the title without the right.

In 2020, ARIDO completed 350 investigations into improper use of the title and sent 166 cease and desist letters to unqualified individuals. 

ARIDO also has a Complaints and Disciplinary process when members contravene the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice. 

How do Registered Interior Designers become qualified?

The path to become a Registered Interior Designer is a rigorous 3 step process.

The current minimum standard for individuals to become a Registered Interior Designer is the following:

  1. EDUCATION: Students must complete a 4-year CIDA-accredited* Bachelor of Interior Design program at an ARIDO recognized school in Ontario.
  2. EXPERIENCE: 3,250 hours of on-the-job training under a qualified professional must be completed in order to gain practical working experience in the field. To begin this process, students become Intern members of ARIDO.
  3. EXAM: Intern members must write the NCIDQ examination which consists of three exams including one which tests practical knowledge. The exams administered by the Council of Interior Design Qualification*. Once they pass these exams, they qualify for Registered membership.

*Council for Interior Design Accreditation

How do individuals trained outside of Canada become Registered Interior Designers?

ARIDO offers the Intern Competency Review System which assesses whether an individual meets the education competencies required for Intern membership for those individuals who have completed outside Ontario, i.e. schooling in other provinces, internationally trained professionals. 

Applicants submit a book of evidence which is reviewed by a Registered member of ARIDO. If their competencies meet the requirements, these individuals may join ARIDO as Intern members and continue on the path to meet the additional requirements (beginning from step 2 in the above information). 

What is ARIDO?

ARIDO is the Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario (ARIDO) and regulates the interior design profession in Ontario, for the betterment of the profession and in the best interests of the public. 

ARIDO sets standards for admission into membership, including education and experience standards, Practice Standards, professional development requirements as well as adherence to a Code of Ethics and Practice Standards.

History of ARIDO

Initially formed in 1934, and renamed as Interior Designers of Ontario, the Association officially became ARIDO with the passing of the ARIDO act by the Ontario Legislature in 1984. 

The act was amended by the passing of Bill Pr6 in 1999 to grant Registered Members who meet ARIDO standards exclusive use of the title ‘Interior Designer’ in Ontario.

ARIDO is a non-profit organization and is managed by a Board of Management of Registered members elected by the membership.

Association Spokespeople

Sharon Portelli headshot

Sharon Portelli, CAE

Executive Director and Registrar

sportelli@arido.ca

Ali Moenck Headshot

Ali Moenck

Communications Coordinator

communications@arido.ca

Past Media

Greenferd Construction Podcast